Tag Archives: behaviour

August 19

Leadership hack 004 – controlling the monkey

We all do it.  Someone questions the work that you have just completed or your thoughts on a topic or problem, and you feel the threatened.  You roll our eyes, become defensive or even worse, passive-aggressive.  Deep inside you know that your response is unhelpful, and does nothing to solve the problems you face or […]

July 29

Leadership hack 002 – Leadership – it is not about you

“People spend 99% of the time thinking about themselves. Actually, that’s probably a little low,” Liam Scott, speechwriter Could this statistic be correct?  While the evidence base for behind this particular claim is questionable, there is some research that does support the view that people spend the majority of the time thinking about themselves (see Scientific American). […]

July 01

Can leadership be defined? Part 5 – What do process based definitions of leadership tell us? By Max Eskell

Leaders provide vision, priorities and alignment. Robert Kaplan Process definitions of leadership attempt to define leaders by what they do and how they behave.  A quick trawl of Flipboard, LinkedIn or even military valour citations (the photo shows the Battle of Rorke’s Drift), shows that leaders are expected to do certain things or behave in a certain […]

April 20

Could personality analytics revolutionise the way you work with others? By Max Eskell

Human interaction is incredibly complex.  People can be very, very different and it takes time to get to know people.  As a result, when we work with someone for the first time we often fail to pick up on their individual nuances of language and body language.  By not being attuned to new people you increase the chance […]

April 12

What can you learn from ‘Nudge’ by Cass Sunstein & Richard Thaler (2009, 312 pages)

In their book ‘Nudge’, Thaler and Sunstein are among the first to set out the arguments for using behavioural insights to change (‘nudge’) people’s behaviour. By changing the context of a decision, they argue it is possible to reduce unhealthy or undesirable decisions. Their main arguments stem from making sure that choices are presented in […]

April 12

What you could learn from ‘Yes! 50 Secrets from the Science of Persuasion’ by Noah Goldstein (2007, 232 pages)

Noah Goldstein consolidates hundreds of research articles and condenses them into 50 secrets of persuasion. Each ‘secret’ is told in a very compelling and digestible way. The writing is concise, with supporting evidence and examples. One of the key insights is the six universal principles of social influence (reciprocity, authority, commitment/consistency, scarcity, liking and social […]

April 07

What you could learn from ‘Switch: How to change things when change is hard’ by Chip and Dan Heath (2011, 320 pages)

This is the excerpt for a placeholder post. It can be deleted, or edited to make it your own.

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